North West Gifted & Talented
Tech Camp

The Royal Institution

The Royal Institution  www.rigb.org

 

The Royal Institution is an independent charity dedicated to bring the amazing world of science to life for young people and adults alike. Our vision is a world where everyone is inspired to think more deeply about science and its place in our lives. To do this, we run a variety of exciting and engaging events in our historic building in central London, home to amazing scientists from history like Michael Faraday, Kathleen Lonsdale, Humphrey Davy and more.

 

Throughout the year we run live talks and science shows with world-famous scientists and thinkers. You might have also heard of the Christmas Lectures, broadcast on the BBC every December. These are the longest running science television show, and were started all the way back in 1825 by Michael Faraday. Filmed in our famous theatre, the Christmas Lectures bring alive a different area of science every year, from mathematics to climate change.

 

In the holidays we also run a busy and varied programme of workshops for students aged 7-18. These workshops are run by experts from industry, university lecturers and expert teachers, offering a look at the amazing applications of STEM subjects. We aim for these workshops to expand students horizons out of the school curriculum and see how STEM subjects are used in the real world. Through the generous support of the Potential Trust we are able to offer subsidised tickets to these workshops to enable children to participate in Ri events and activities if this would otherwise be difficult.

 

We also have a wealth of digital content available for free on our website. Check out Christmas Lectures going back to the 1960s, enjoy a huge range of science talks and short videos on your YouTube channel, and get ideas of science activities to do with your children with our ExpeRimental series. Wherever you are in the world, we have digital content available to bring you on an exciting journey through the amazing world of Science.

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